European Travel: Converted Amalfi Coast monastery offers breathtaking views

AMALFI COAST, ITALY—On Tuesday, June 10, 1913, in Princeton’s Alexander Hall, Milton M. Brown took his diploma with all the assurance of a young man who knew where he was going in life. Plans were in the works to pursue his dream of becoming a travel lecturer on the Lyceum or Chautauqua circuits. His first set of lectures would be on Italy, which he had fallen in love with during a European grand tour in 1911. Following his passion for history, art, architecture and culture, he chose Rome and Naples as each deserving their own lectures.

European Travel: Converted Amalfi Coast monastery offers breathtaking views – thestar.com http://bit.ly/QjN9pG @torontostar

A monk looks out over the Amalfi Coast of Italy in this old photo taken by the writer's grandfather. A luxury hotel now occupies the site of the old monastery.

A monk looks out over the Amalfi Coast of Italy in this old photo taken by the writer’s grandfather. A luxury hotel now occupies the site of the old monastery.

Europe Travel: The fabulous flavours of

FLORENCE, ITALY — Cameras flash. Mouths drop open, and silence falls over a small group of tourists standing in awe before one of Italy’s oldest works of art — a wall of cured meats.

A beastly aroma fills the air. Legs of prosciutto and strings of salami form a canopy inside the old Norcineria, a meat and salami shop in the heart of Florence. An impassioned guide serves up delicious tidbits of gastro-history along with a selection of dried ham, a food dating back to the Romans. And from the first savory bite of finocchiona, a fennel-and-pork salami, the shop is transformed into a food museum, where tourists thrill at eating the art.

Europe Travel: The fabulous flavours of Italy – thestar.com http://bit.ly/QaJGtz @torontostar

There's just something about Tuscan food that makes us weep with joy. Even the menu looks tasty.

There’s just something about Tuscan food that makes us weep with joy. Even the menu looks tasty.

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